Why Silver is the Place to Be

In case you don’t know the main reason why silver is the place to be, here’s a little excerpt from a Ted Butler speech.

Cambridge House Phoenix Silver Summit 2010
Silver Review and Outlook
February 4, 2010
Theodore Butler

“Last year, I observed silver’s past, or the time period covering thousands of years up until about 5 years ago. I tried to describe how silver was always a highly desired precious metal, valued for its beauty and value in jewelry and ornaments and as money, much like its fellow precious metal gold. And, starting 100 to 150 years ago, how silver evolved into a vital and strategic industrial commodity. This transformation of silver into a modern industrial material was predicated upon its physical and chemical properties. These properties included it being the best conductor of electricity, the best transfer agent of heat, the best reflector of light, the most efficient photographic chemical and the most versatile biocide. In fact, silver is used in more industrial applications than any other metal.

Because of the wide range of uses in which silver is the preferred ingredient, it began to be industrially consumed in prodigious quantities. So great was the industrial consumption of silver, that the world used more, starting around the beginning of World War II, than it could produce from mining and recycling. That over-consumption mandated that previously produced silver, in the form of world inventories, be consumed, in addition to mining and recycling. The net result was that over 60 or 70 years, the above ground inventories of silver were depleted by 90% or more. In other words, we have only 10% in world silver bullion inventories of what we had back 70 years ago. We had 10 billion ounces of silver bullion inventories then; now we have 1 billion ounces remaining.

At the same time, gold inventories grew dramatically over the past 70 years, as gold’s industrial consumption did not develop like silver’s did, mainly because gold was and is one of the most expensive materials in the world. It’s not that gold didn’t have its own special physical and chemical properties; it’s just that you don’t use an expensive material unless you have no other choice. The bottom line, silver’s inventories were used up; gold’s inventories grew

The net result of this was one of the most incredible situations ever witnessed in world history, namely, that a comparable commodity that was rarer than another commodity could be much cheaper than the more plentiful commodity. In above ground bullion inventories, gold is more plentiful than silver, yet silver is less than 1.5% the price of gold. Common sense should tell you that such a relationship is absurd and cannot last indefinitely. Investment sense should also tell you that price relationship is absurd and unlikely to last, creating the best reason to buy underpriced silver.

Finally, despite the ease by which these relative gold/silver world inventory statistics can be verified, less than one-tenth of one percent of the world’s citizens are aware of the fact that silver is rarer than gold. I would guess that a good percent of those who do know, are in this room today.”

So . . . . if you knew something that only “one-tenth of one percent of the world’s citizens are aware of – the fact that silver is rarer than gold” wouldn’t it be a good idea to be in a business that should benefit as more people learn about silver? Especially since it already is.

Help us spread the word about silver while you receive silver coins in the mail and earn bonus silver coins. It’s all good. Great little sideline business / hobby. And just fun to get Silver Eagles in the mail.